Friday, November 30, 2018

Weekend Top 6 Picks for December 1 and 2, 2018

Saturday December 1, 2018
10am to Noon Free. Orlando Shakes Volunteer Orientation. Orlando Shakes 812 E Rollins St, Orlando, Florida 32803. Please join us for Orlando Shakes' Volunteer Orientation - a perfect way to learn more about volunteering. Returning volunteers will brush-up on the basics and changing policies; new volunteers will learn what they need to know to join the team.
During this free orientation, all our volunteers will learn how to get involved, take a brief tour of the Theater, receive an overview of benefits and policies, and enjoy some light breakfast food and drinks!
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Breakfast & Check-In: 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Orientation: 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Questions: 11:00 AM - 11:15 AM

8pm to 10pm Free. Shuffleboard at Orlando's Beardall Courts.  Orlando's Beardall Courts 800 Delaney Ave Orlando FL. 1st Saturday of every month.

10:30pm to 12:30am Free but get food and or drink. Son Flamenco. Ceviche Tapas Orlando, 125 W Church St, Orlando, FL.

Sunday December 2 2018
10am to Noon. Free. Heartfulness Relaxation and Meditation Class. University, 5200 Vineland Rd, Orlando, FL 32811. The Method of Heartfulness A simple and practical way to experience the heart’s unlimited resources.

Noon to 3pm Donation based. Music at the Casa. George Weremchuk and the Hippocrene Saxophone Quartet. Casa Feliz Historic Home Museum, 656 N Park Ave, Winter Park, FL 32789. Members of the public are invited to visit the historic home museum, listen to live music and take a tour of our historic home museum and the James Gamble Rogers II Studio by trained docents.

2pm to 4pm. Museum admission applies. Adults $10,  Seniors (60+) $8, College Students with ID $8, Students (K-12) $3, Members and children 4 and under are free. Meet and Greet Jan Kaláb. Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Gardens, 633 Osceola Ave, Winter Park, FL 32789. Contemporary Prague artist Jan Kaláb is known internationally for his innovative 3-D graffiti. Born in Czechoslovakia in 1978 at a time when graffiti was a form of protest in Eastern Europe, he made a name for himself in the 1990s as the country was opening itself up to Western influences. Kaláb later became known across Europe as “Cakes” and took his art to New York in 2000, making an impression while painting train cars alongside other well-known graffiti artists. Since 2007 Kaláb has experimented with abstractions on canvas, earning him solo exhibitions in Argentina, Germany, Paris, London, New York, and Miami. The Polasek Museum exhibit will include sculptures, 3-D canvases, select new works, and an original installation.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Corsets and Cuties Holiday Kick-off at the Venue

Pam Schwartz and I went to a dress rehearsal for Corsets and Cuties at The Venue (511 Virginia Dr, Orlando, FL 32803). With all the development in Ivanhoe Village, the Venue's days are numbered. It will soon be demolished to make way for more development. This rehearsal was for a Christmas Holiday Kick-off. This Burlesque Cabaret troupe is not for the faint of heart, but for those with a sense of humor and adventure.

The Christmas tree was fluffed and decorated with care and the Cuties marquee was hung by the boys. An opening number featured Rudolf the Red Nosed Reindeer. All the dancers wore red antlers and pranced with innocent charm. Rudolf came with a glowing red nose until it too was stripped and left to the wayside to allow for some flowing gyrations.

Lady Jaimz explained that they had bought some Disney Costumes at a Lake Howell High School sale, so everyone had matching green holiday garb for the final number. A dancer wasn't at the rehearsal, so We didn't see every act but what ensued was the usual chaos and fun anarchy.

The December 1st performance promises a chance to start the season with some fun and teasing with Corsets and Cuties.
Doors and bar open at 9pm.
Showtime 10pm.
Special gifts from sponsor Premier Couples Superstore.
Tickets are $18 by pre-order or at the door. 


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Stetson Mansion for the Holidays


I arranged to sketch the Stetson Mansion (1031 Camphor Lane, DeLand, FL 32720) because they decorate the place for the Christmas Holiday Season. The Stetson Mansion built in 1886 is part of Florida's First Luxury Estate and the grandest home ever built in Florida before the 20th century. Built for famed hat maker and philanthropist John B. Stetson, this winter retreat is Florida’s only richly detailed mansion actually built in the “Gilded Age” which ended in 1899.

The eclectic and unusual “High Victorian” architectural design not only had the most advanced technology of its day, it also includes a variety of complicated interior carvings, 16 patterns of the nation's most rare and intricate parquet wood floors and 10,000 panes of original leaded glass windows. The understated decorations on the exterior are meant to just allow the architecture to shine. Inside is an entirely different story.

The 8th Annual Christmas Spectacular has the interior is ornately decorated for the holidays and has to be seen to be believed.  Holiday Home Tours continue through January 15th and need to be reserved online. I only had time for one sketch, so I didn't sketch inside. Being part of tour would mean I wouldn't have time to sketch in any one room anyway.

I started sketching as the last tour of the day went inside. I was told I had 90 minutes before the tour let out. I worked hard to catch the fading light. After the sun set I discovered that my iPad attracted mosquitoes. They swarmed around my hands as I sketched and tapped against the illuminate glass screen. When they started buzzing in my ears, I lost patience and had to run for the car to escape. A few got inside the car with me and I punched at the windshield to crush them. I am sure I got the last one out as I opened the car window as I was driving and he got sucked outside. That didn't stop me from itching on the entire drive back.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Brian Feldman's William Shakespeare's Macbeth


It is a tale
Told by an idiot,
full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.

I went to sketch a one man performance of Macbeth at the Walt Disney Amphitheatre at Lake Eola Park (99 N Rosalind Ave, Orlando, Florida 32801). Several smart phones were set up on tripods to live stream the performance. The program came complete with a set of ear plugs which was a mystery at first. Brian Feldman took to the band shell stage covered in protective gear, another mystery. He held a script and was about to perform the play solo acting out every part. Brian made his acting debut in 1991 in Macbeth on the Lake Eola stage as a child actor.

Actors consider it bad luck to say Macbeth in a theater. Neil Barnes from Essex explained it this way, "Theatrical folklore has it that, as revenge for Shakespeare's inclusion of a number of accurate spells within the play, a coven of witches cursed it for all eternity. Whether or not you believe this rationale is irrelevant, though, because the ill-fortune associated with the play is backed up by numerous examples over its four hundred year history Initially, King James banned the play for five years because he had such a dislike for it, but there are also more bloody examples: there was an unpleasant and lethal riot after one showing in nineteenth century New York and one Lady Macbeth fell off the front of the stage while sleepwalking, dropping nearly twenty feet. Even Olivier wasn't free from the curse, as one of his performances was enlivened by a falling stage weight which landed only inches from him mid-performance. Given the weight of evidence, it's not surprising that actors are given to indulge in a little superstition." Others explained that if tickets for a particular play were not selling well, the theater owners would end the run and replace it with the ever popular Macbeth. Either way, you will never hear an actor utter "Macbeth" inside a theater.

Granted the Lake Eola Band Shell is outside, but years ago this is where Shakespeare plays were performed before the Shakes moved into the theater in Lock Haven Park. I saw a production here when I first moved to Orlando back in 1994.

Brian began his performance. The first word he uttered was, "Macbeth" followed by "Macbeth" and then "Macbeth". He held the full script in his hands and read the entire play replacing each word with "Macbeth" and trying to maintain the emotion and relevance of each line. He was tempting fate with each word he uttered. At times Macbeths got tangled together as he trued to say them in quick succession. Now the ear plugs made sense. Hearing this endless litany of Macbeths could drive a person mad. I might have missed a few of the plot twists as I focused on my sketch.

The play in all runs about 69 minutes and I was chucking to myself the entire time despite the tragedy being acted out on stage. Irene Pynn produced and directed the production. As she said in the program, "The process was more conceptual than straightforward. Less 'Give me a stronger emphasis on the third line' and more, 'How many people will curse us for doing this?'"


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Monday, November 26, 2018

Pop Up Gallery at Nora’s Sugar Shack


I went to Nora’s Sugar Shack (636 Virginia Drive Orlando FL) to sketch the opening of a Pop up gallery show for photographer Robert “Kap” Kaplinger. This was the debut of a monthly series of shows at Nora’s. The shows are a collaboration between Nora Booker and Frankie Messina of Apartment E. These pop up exhibits happen every second Tuesday of each month.

Nora’s Sugar Shack is a quirky little white clapboard bungalow with a red door, although the entrance is actually around back. The place offers wine, beer and cigars. The gallery was in a small room maybe 10 by 15 feet in size. Frankie Messina set up his analog record DJ station at one end of the room and I sat down beside him for my view of the event. The opening was well attended. Nora stood behind the bar.

The photos were black and white featuring native Florida flora and fauna. The crowd got so dense that they spilled out onto the patio which is where a few puffed on cigars. One guy wore the same hat as Heisenberg in Breaking Bad, so I ended up sketching him several times. Nora’s has the vibe of an antique shop with fun nick knacks and vintage lighting. A small table in the corner had some bottles of wine and some information about the photographer.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Sunday, November 25, 2018

Spring Pops, The Race for Space


The City of Winter Park hosted the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra led by conductor Dean Whiteside as they presented Spring Pops in Winter Park’s Central Park main stage. Patrons set up on the grass lawn with blankets and lawn chairs. Some folks came really prepared with wine candles and a full spread. Everyone was ready for a relaxing evening of music under the stars. The sun set behind the stage as I sketched creating a warm glow behind the performers. I squinted as I starred straight into the sunset.

The evening featured music by composer John Williams along with other space themed music. Guest vocalists for the night were Natalie Cordone and Shawn Kilgore. I was set up and sketching before the performer got on stage. I was fascinated with the cello player that had a wheel on the bottom of his instrument so he could roll it around like a wheel barrel. By the end of the performance the stage s lit by two stage spot lights that had been set up stage left and right.

It is so nice to enjoy an outdoor concert as the northern states are still experiencing cold temperatures. As I write this I am at my Sister’s home in Port Charlotte Florida. She is looking up photos of the snow covered landscapes in the northern towns where out other brothers and sisters live. There is nothing so rewarding as seeing cold weather while basking in the Florida sun.



Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Saturday, November 24, 2018

Fundraiser and Sneak Peek: Female 12th Night

Roque  Pub  (3076  Curry Ford Road  Orlando,  FL 32806) hosted a fundraiser for the Female 12th Night. The Orlando Shakes presented the show back in February and March.

A pair of shipwrecked twins set into motion a tale of mistaken identity, eccentricity, and unlikely love. Separated from her brother Sebastian, quick-thinking Viola adopts a male disguise and enters the service of the handsome Duke Orsino - only to find herself in the middle of a love triangle. When Viola’s new boss sends her to win his unrequited love, the Countess Olivia, her disguise proves too effective and the Countess falls for the young girl dressed as a boy instead.

The show features  endless gender swapping and was presented at first with an all male cast. That show was then followed by several performances by an all female cast. I saw the all male cast and it was laugh out loud funny. I unfortunately never saw the whole female performance of the same show but at this Roque Fundraiser, I got to see several excerpts. I sketched the event organizers as things got started.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Friday, November 23, 2018

Weekend Top 6 Picks for November 24 and 25, 2018

Saturday November 24, 2018
9am to 5pm Free. Coastal Christmas Market. Downtown New Smyrna Beach Canal Street and Sam Avenue . Outdoor Holiday Market.

Noon to 5pm Free. FusionFest. Seneff Arts Plaza Dr Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. 
FusionFest is a free two-day celebration in Downtown Orlando that features a kaleidoscopic fusion of aromas, sights, sounds, tastes, textures and fascinating short films that represent the diverse origins and heritages of our community
Presented by Dr. Phillips Center, FusionFest is a project of the Downtown Arts District with support from Orange County Government, the City of Orlando/Downtown Development Board and a growing grassroots movement.

4:30pm to 7pm $12. Light Up Mount Dora. Historic Donnelly House 535 N Donnelly Street Mount Dora. Dinner in the Historic home before Mount Dora lights up for the holidays.

Sunday November 25, 2018
10am to Noon. Free. Heartfulness Relaxation and Meditation Class. University, 5200 Vineland Rd, Orlando, FL 32811. The Method of Heartfulness A simple and practical way to experience the heart’s unlimited resources.

11am to 5pm Free. Holiday Makers Market. Casa Feliz The Pines at Windermere, 3409 Maguire Road Windermere FL.  Meet local artists and purchase their one of a kind creations.

3pm to 5pm Free. Handles Massiah. Bob Carr Theatre 401 W. Livingston Street  Orlando, Florida. Messia Choral Society celebrating 46 years is Olando's Longest running free cultural arts performance.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Thursday, November 22, 2018

Cemetaries as Museums


Pam Schwartz and I went to the Osceola County Welcome Center and History Museum (4155 W Vine St, Kissimmee, Florida 34741)to listen to guest speaker Kevin Gidusko from the Florida Public Archaeology Network as he spoke about the preservation of historic cemeteries.

His talk covered, the archaeological process in cemeteries, the use iconography and headstone styles to date sites, and preservation and dating techniques. Cemeteries are a rather recent phenomenon when compared to the entire history of the world.  Cemeteries have had an important place in our culture since the beginning of recorded time. Taking special care to honor our ancestors and have a proper final resting place for them is one of the things that makes us uniquely human.



Many cemeteries are now being documented online on Find a Grave making finding distant relatives for genealogy increasingly easy. Any cemetery is a  place where we can see the people who helped shape our history. Weathering, vandalism, neglect, and encroachment by development and plant growth threaten the fate of historic cemeteries. Because of this it is important to systematically survey and document these historic sites before they are forever lost.


The intricate carvings on headstones can tell much about the beliefs of the person buried. Common designs in the 19th and early 20 centuries included urns, Latin crosses, willow trees, doves, lambs, hands bibles, flowers and vines. For instance the symbol of a weeping willow reflected the interest in the United States in ancient Greece. The most obvious meaning is the "Weeping" or mourning for the loss of a loved one. A willow is a fast growing tree that is easy to grow from cuttings and often is the first tree to grow on a disturbed site. Thus the tree is known as healing. In many cultures the willow tree is a symbol for immortality.


Kevin let us know that there are many opportunities to volunteer should we want to take part in the preservation of cemeteries.

The event was sponsored in part by Gatorland.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Veterans Day Ceremony at Evergreen Cemetery


On Veterans Day a small group of Orlando Urban Sketchers went to Evergreen Cemetery in Casselberry. The cemetery dates back to 1890 when 18 acres of land was donated for the establishment of a cemetery for black slaves. At the time blacks and white were not allowed to be buried together. The cemetery was surrounded by forest with oak trees, sand pines, evergreen, camphor and palm trees, along with wild fern growing though out. The first pioneer trustees of the cemetery worked in the fern industry and they went on to build their own grocery store and shotgun homes on the site of the cemetery.

A shotgun home was a narrow house without halls. If a bullet were to be fired through the front door, it would go right out the back door without hitting a wall. These homes were rent free and known as the Barnett and Casselberry quarters. Five churches helped maintain the cemetery. One common cemetery maintenance practice was to cut the sand pines as Christmas trees. The original name of Evergreen Cemetery was forgotten over the years. It came to be known as Altamonte Colored Cemetery and Fern Park Cemetery. In 2007 Alton Williams found the original name in his research it was restored.

Alton Willaims was the Master of Ceremonies for this Veteran's Day Ceremony. People crowded under a tent to stay out of the Florida sun. The Seminole County Sheriff Office Honor Guard performed a pre ceremony drill followed by a trumpet player performing taps in the distance. The sad notes resonated through the cemetery. Behind Alton was the framework for a shotgun house being built as a museum on the cemetery grounds. Volunteers are desperately needed to help finish the construction.

Cora Sneed called the names of all the fallen soldiers who were buried in Greenwood Cemetery. One woman in the audience seemed to know many of the family names being called and she picked up the certificates to be given to each family. Entire families went up to honor their relatives who had given their lives for our freedom. After the ceremony we all were given Bubbalou's BBQ.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Fusion Fest Open House


A FusionFest Open House was held at City Beautiful Church, (1220 Alden Rd, Orlando, FL 32803). The primary goal was to gather the interest of volunteers and to share with the community what this new cultural event which is a celebration of diversity.

Terry Olson explained that Orlando is a melting pot and as a city we have never shied away from celebrating our roots. He said he has been to 62 different cultural events in central Florida. "I know, because I have been to all of them." he explained. An international festival of this scope would have to be large and this meeting was the first step on spreading the word. Signs on each of the tables outlined ways that people can share their heritage.

100 booths are planned to be set up in Seneff Arts Plaza in front of the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts (Orange Ave and City Commons downtown). Outside City Hall and in front of the arts Center entrance there will be performance stages.

Food vendors were encouraged to serve small affordable dishes so that people attending the event can sample food from many different cultures. FusionFest is free, but you can purchase food tokens at the food and drink court. Fusion Fest is scheduled for November 24 and 25,  2018 the week following Thanksgiving. The festivities begin at noon each day.

Mark your calendar.
FusionFest
November 24 and 25, 2018
Noon to Sunset
Seneff Arts Plaza 445 S Magnolia Ave, Orlando, FL 32801
Free.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Monday, November 19, 2018

onePULSE Foundation Town Hall Forum – Changing Hate…A Conversation


The onePULSE Foundation Town Hall Forum - Changing Hate...A Conversation, was held at the Orlando Rep (1001 East Princeton Street Orlando FL). The set was for a production of Elf.

Hate crimes in our nation’s 10 largest cities increased by 12% in 2017 the highest level in more than a decade. This Town Hall Forum brought national key influencers to Orlando to discuss how they overcame a hateful belief system, are addressing hateful messages and reaching others to dispel the belief that hate is learned.

I sketched the Morgan Stanley banker who introduced the evening at the podium. Barbara Poma the Pulse night club owner and founder of the one Pulse Foundation also introduced the evening. The panel was moderated by Sally Kohn, author of The Opposite Of Hate: A Field Guide to Repairing Our Humanity she is also a  CNN political commentator and columnist.

Panelist Daryl Davis, author of Klan-destine Relationships: A Black Man’s Odyssey in the Ku Klux Klan spoke about his childhood growing up in Europe where white and black are not an issue. His family returned to America and he joined the boy scouts. His troupe was invited to walk in a parade. He gladly put on his uniform and joined his fellow scouts on the parade. However during the course of the parade several small boys and adults began to throw small rocks. He thought, "They must not like boy scouts." It wasn't until troupe leaders shielded him that he realized that the rocks were only meant for him. At home his parents had to patch his wounds and he asked why people had a problem with him. He had never heard of racism. He couldn't understand how someone could hate him if they didn't know him.

Thus began a life long mission to speak with members of the KKK who hated him. Many of these conversations resulted in friendships. Daryl collects KKK memorabilia from people he has talked to who gave up their life of hate. Over 200 Klansman have left the KKK after these conversations with Daryl.

Dylan Marron is a blogger and host of Conversations with People Who Hate Me. He experienced a rush of euphoria as his online persona took flight. However this success also resulted in hate directed towards him online. He become obsessed with finding out who these people were who hated him. He would look up their contact information on social media and call them. These recorded conversations are what he shares online now. He and Daryl bot agreed that giving someone the chance to express their opinions often resulted in them being willing to hear their opinion. Conversation is about acknowledging someones self worth. In the course of each conversation there is usually a moment when someone has a dog rush in the room, of they step on a Lego. The moment they laugh together gives him a glowing moment of hope. All the differences of opinion melt away.

Sally asked everyone in the audience to think of three issues that they hold dear, be it abortion, gun control etc. Then she asked us all how many of us had researched that issue with government reports, research, or read multiple books on the issue. No one raised a hand. This is how people who have an opposite opinion also came to their conclusions. They only read enough to justify how they feel.

At the end of the evening, Theresa Jacobs who is stepping down as Orange County's Mayor took to the podium. With one day left in office she seemed to want to clear the slate. She spoke of her childhood fear of black people but in school she befriended a black girl who had given her a pencil. Because she sat at the lunch table with this girl, she was ostracized by white students. She mentioned a gay boy who she dated and then a black boy she performed a trapeze act with. She expressed her support for transvestites but I think she meant to say transgender. This was the wrong forum to make that slip.  It was a strange litany and I stopped believing her sincerity.

In office she is best known as the woman who did all she could to block gay marriage, saying. "marriage should be reserved for a man and a woman." She confided that this is the issue that conflicted with her Catholic beliefs. At a wedding for her son, she realized how her family was so important to her and how the vows in any wedding mean so much for her families happiness. She broke down and cried and realized she had been wrong. Everyone should have the right to get married and share that happiness.

Though every panelist agreed that we are living in dark times and that hate speech is rampant, they choose to battle the ignorance and hate one conversation at a time. If you disagree with someone try and avoid expressing your disdain, instead stop and listen and share your thoughts. This Thanksgiving if you have a relative who supports today's atmosphere of intolerance and hate, try talking to them and plant a seed of light in the darkness. Change doesn't happen quickly. But some people can change.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Sunday, November 18, 2018

Creative Momentum Gathering


This free Creative Momentum Gathering, hosted by LifeArt Studio founder, Lezlie Laws, and Writers Block Bookstore, was a chance to not only hear Charlene's story, but to hear tips and encouragement for all journalers, memoirists and writers. It was an opportunity to come together as a creative community to reflect on the power of words, and to explore the love, sacrifice and endurance that's needed to create our own unique life art. 

Charlene Edge read from her book, "Undertow: My Escape from the Fundamentalism and Cult Control of The Way International" in a back room at Cocina (214 151 E Welbourne Ave, Winter Park, Florida 32789). Charlene is a devout person and she loves the academic side of religion which eventually lead to Charlene being promoted to the inner circle of biblical researchers, where she discovered devastating secrets. The organization's founder, Wierwille, twisted texts of Scripture to serve his personal agenda, shamelessly plagiarized the work of others, and misrepresented the purpose of his organization. Worst of all, after Wierwille died in 1985, shocking reports surfaced of his secret sex ring. Undertow is not only a brilliant cautionary tale about misplaced faith but also an exposé of the hazards of fundamentalism and the destructive nature of cults. Through her personal story, Charlene Edge shows how a vulnerable person can be seduced into following an authoritarian leader and how difficult it can be to find a way out.

Lezlie Laws was conducting a workshop the day Charlene decided to start to tell her story. Writing the book took years to complete but she persevered thanks to a supportive artistic community. There was a warm feeling of love and support in the room for this local author who was sharing her work.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Saturday, November 17, 2018

VegFest


This year's VegFest was held at Festival Bay Park. This festival has grown exponentially since I started sketching it back in 2010. Pam Schwartz and I did a full walk about and ordered some vegetarian food for lunch. I ordered a Dosa which was much larger than I expected. A dosa is an Indian version of a pancake but much thinner. Mine was filled with some mashed potatoes and spices. It was tasty, but honestly I couldn't eat the whole thing.

The food tents were set up on a narrow pathway through the center of the park. This arrangement created a major traffic funnel with line of people blocking traffic in every direction. Had they move the tends back off the pathway then strolling by could have been a more pleasant experience. Pam's  dog, Sprout came out too the festival with us and he and a great time. There were so many scents and things to see. He also got to meet so many other pups.

There was a cute little pig that people could pet but when I returned to do a possible sketch he was being taken for a walk. I settled instead on this tent full of people meditating. Pam warned me that they would stop meditating once I started sketching and she was right. Regardless I stayed committed and got some semblance of a sketch.

We walked around some more once my sketch was done. There were a few politicians since Mid Term elections were right around the corner. It seems Florida is the laughing stock of the country again since there is a major recount for three of those mid term election races. In the 2006 election there were hanging chads to contend with but today there seems to be inefficiency and an inability to count quickly. Hopefully every vote will count. We all need to take a moment and breath deeply. Ohmmmmmm........


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Friday, November 16, 2018

Weekend Top 6 Picks for November 17 and 18, 2018

Saturday November 17, 2018
 8am to 1pm Free. Parramore Farmers Market. The east side of the Orlando City Stadium, across from City View. Purchase quality, fresh and healthy food grown in your own neighborhood by local farmers, including Fleet Farming, Growing Orlando, and other community growers.

3pm to 8pm Buy food and drink. Lucky 7 Rock the Block Party / Maxine's 7th Anniversary Party. Maxine's on Shine 337 N Shine Ave, Orlando, Florida 32803. WOW... Has Time Flown By. Seven Years, We Says, We Says... Seven Years of Epicurean Cheer. Right Here. Because of You, Doing What You Do..We Have Thrived, And That Ain't No Jive!!! So let's have a massive celebration, an exclamation, a City Beautiful proclamation, of a good ole block partay staycation, where life is good in the neighborhood! FREE SHOW DON"T YOU KNOW! We will wage you will find no better musical sage on any stage, and vaudevillian performers too, round out the performing crew. The Shine Ave band shell will be a rocking with Eugene Snowden and Friends, Katie Burkess Band and Maygen Navarro street side, and Juno Smile does the lyrical mile on the inside. Vaudeville llc, will be flowing creativity. Win a holiday party for 10, while you have an opportunity, to help others in our Community. The restaurant will be open all day for food and tasty beverage purchases of your choosing, everyone's a winner.. no losing. All ages, and well behaved four legged friends welcome. We truly appreciate your embrace, of our sexy, comfortable and delicious space. - Cheers, Kirt and Maxine Earhart "Much Love to All of You"

5pm to 9pm Free. McRay Holiday Open House. 1000 Arlington St, Orlando, FL 32805. It’s time for Holiday Open House! Meet artists, tour studios, buy unique gifts! Creations by 23 Artists to Be Featured.
McRae Art Studios will kick off the holidays with their Holiday Open House on Saturday, Nov. 17. The annual event, open to the public, will be in the studio group’s new home in Orlando. Last year, the 23-member artist collective, the largest in Central Florida, returned to the city where it was founded 32 years ago.
The eagerly awaited annual Holiday Open House at McRae (mcraeartstudios.com) gives art collectors and gift-givers a unique opportunity to browse artist studios, visit with the artists and purchase original art. Hundreds of original art works will be available including paintings, pastels, photographs, mixed media, sculpture, jewelry and ceramics.
Secure on-site parking is available.
MCRAE ART STUDIOS, a collective of 23 independent artists founded in 1986, was established to allow member artists to work together and to attract community attention to the area’s outstanding talent. McRae maintains the highest level of artistic accomplishment by bringing artists into the group by a jury process. It has been home to many nationally recognized artists. Twice a year, McRae hosts Open Houses that attract thousands of visitors and collectors.

Sunday November 18, 2018
10am to Noon. Free. Heartfulness Relaxation and Meditation Class. University, 5200 Vineland Rd, Orlando, FL 32811. The Method of Heartfulness A simple and practical way to experience the heart’s unlimited resources.

Noon to 1pm Free. Yoga. Near Lake Eola red gazebo. Bring your own mat.

Noon to 3pm Donation based. Music at the Casa. Vocalist Shirley Wang. Casa Feliz Historic Home Museum, 656 N Park Ave, Winter Park, FL 32789. Members of the public are invited to visit our historic home museum on a Sunday afternoon to listen to live music and take a tour of our historic home museum and the James Gamble Rogers II Studio by trained docents.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Thursday, November 15, 2018

ODD at Lake Eola Wine Company


ODD (Orlando Drink and Draw) is a monthly sketch event I host where I invite artists to go to a different bar each month. There is no model and no instruction, it is just a chance to get out and meet other artists while working on a sketch. I was living near Lake Eola and Eola Wine Company (430 E. Central Blvd Orlando, FL 32801) was just a block from my studio, so this was a convenient location to hang out and sketch.

I ordered a red wine and sketched the length of the bar. It was early in the evening so the place was just starting to fill up. There is a certain refined atmosphere to the place as patrons sip glasses of red wine rather than mugs of beer. Well, they do have beers, but wine is the usual drinks of choice. This was a rare evening where no other artists came out for the night. I think the prospect of downtown parking scares off artists. Regardless, I had fun blocking in my sketch and when done, I simply walked the block or so back to my studio.

The next night, I was interviewed by Pam Schwartz of the Orange County Regional History Center about my experiences in the weeks following the Pulse Nightclub Massacre. Since that night, she tends to join me on many of these types of sketch outings. I tend to keep my head in the sketch for the entire hour or two until it is done, so she can chat with artists or patrons while I work and when I am done, I join the conversations. For me this is the best of both worlds, I get absolute focus and then come up for air and enjoy the company of the artists around me.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Assassins


I went to sketch the opening night performance of Assassins at Breakthrough Theater (419 W Fairbanks Ave, Winter Park, FL 32789). Stephen Sondheim wrote the music and lyrics and he also wrote the music for one of my favorite shows, Sunday in the Park with George. I had never seen Assassins but since I love Sondheim, I had to go. The book was by John Weidman, and the show was directed by Angela Cotto.

Breakthrough theater is a tiny little gem in Winter Park. The  lobby was warm and welcoming with a concessions stand. The walls were covered floor to ceiling with framed posters from past shows. This show wasn't as crowded as I would have expected for a Sondheim musical.

The premise of the show was strange and unsettling. Assassins from throughout America's history assembled together to justify their second Amendment right to bear arms and kill presidents. In the opening act, Iris M. Johnson, acted as a gun dealer offering guns to each assassin in turn to bolster their self worth and ego. John Wilkes Booth, (Gabrial Garcia) sang a ballad,  about why he needed to kill Abraham Lincoln after the  Civil War had ended.

Every Assassin was always waving around a gun, and sitting in the front row, I felt uncomfortable having so many weapons pointed in my general direction. Granted they were clearly toy guns and the audio sound effects were faint caps popping any time a gun was fired.

In one scene, Rebecca McVeigh as “Squeaky” Fromme, the girlfriend of Charles Manson, and Carol Jaqueline Palumbo as Sara Jane Moore, started shooting at a bucket of Kentucky Fried chicken. Squeeky's manic laughter was truly terrifying, but what was more terrifying was the fact that so many people in the audience were laughing. Perhaps this is deeply ingrained in America, we are taught from an early age that violence is funny and entertaining.

Lee Harvey Oswald (Scott Gilbert) had a conscience. He went to work carrying a package of curtain rods. His minimum wage job left him with low self esteem. The entire cast of assassins, sang a song encouraging him to shoot John Kennedy. According to them his act of violence would help keep their memory alive. When he opened the package of curtain rods, he found a rifle. At one point they became a chorus line waving their guns in unison.

I find myself sketching people who are still deeply affected by the massacre at Pulse. I respected Anderson Cooper for never saying the gunman's name when reporting about the Pulse Nightclub massacre. The names of these assassins are better left unsaid. The very premise of the play seems to make light of the horror of such violent acts. I lost some respect for Sondheim for writing this musical that seems to glorify and justify the acts of these assassins. Perhaps the show might make audiences think twice about gun control, but the message is lost if they laugh instead. A mentally deranged person seeing this play might think that they might one day share the fame of these assassins. We are sitting on a powder keg. All that said, one song from the show keeps ringing in my head. (Why did You Do it Johnny?)

Performances of Assassins continue through November 26, 2018.
Tickets are $20 General Admission, $18 Seniors, $15 Students, and $12 on Mondays.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Story Corps at the Library


Alisa Petit and Diana Griffith, are two very dear friends who have seen other relationships come and go. They spoke to Story Corps about the strength and fluidity of their friendship. Diana founded Orlando Lady Boss which is an online podcast in which she helps value based businesses tell their unique brand story so they can attract their ideal customers. She offers news about women empowerment and feminism plus best tips about digital storytelling and online marketing so businesses can grow their brand based on their values. 

Carla and Sally Stanton Brown were a mother and daughter with old Florida roots. Carla recognized me form past events I had sketched. While Maria Gabriella Toledo and Vivi Valencia Serrano were employees of the Library. Unfortunately the time spent filling out forms in the green room wasn't always enough time to learn anything about the people participating in Story Corps. The final interviews in the Library of Congress are the final result.

Ross McCoy and Don Price were the final people I sketched for the project. They both like to blow things up which is a fair binder for any friendship. Ross is a comedian and Don was the caretaker at Greenwood Cemetery for years. I had sketched him before when the History Center did an oral history with him about the Cemetery's response to the Pulse Nightclub Massacre. He is a treasure trove for any Orlando History and lore. His nighttime Greenwood Cemetery tour has been a staple for years. During the Story Corps interview, I could hear them laughing from down the hall. That must have been a fun time.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Monday, November 12, 2018

Post Story Corps Interviews


A mom (Riley Roca) and daughter (Celeste Kuri) discussed how the library Children's Business Fair was a supportive environment for Super Soaps, an idea that won the $50 prize for the Highest business potential. Celeste started making soap as a hobby when she was about 9 years old. "I made them for fun and I didn’t think I would get anywhere with them. I gave them to my family. When I heard about the fair, I thought that I could make soaps because I love making soaps. One of my cousins is allergic to a lot of things. So I decided to color and scent them with natural products. I have colored my soaps with turmeric and beet root and scented them with essential oils. My parents helped me a lot along the way." She said in a Library post online. It was wonderful to see how supportive Riley was of her daughter who is home schooled. The library is a major resource for her home schooling needs.

Jessica Dawson and Sam Singhaus were close years ago but had a falling out. They came together to do the Story Corps interview. Sam is a local celebrity. I have seen him many times performing as Miss Sammy at events around town. He participated in Drag Queen Story Hour at the Orlando Public Library. Impulse  Group Orlando organized the event which was presented in the spirit of the City of Orlando and One Alliance’s “Acts of Love and Kindness” movement. I am proud of the library for sponsoring the program which must have been fun. Any time I have seen Sammy perform I know I will laugh out loud. Jessica's voice gave out so the interview had to be cut short, but it was heart warming to know that these friends realized that their differences weren't as important as what they have in common.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Sunday, November 11, 2018

PlayFest: My Lord What a Night


The final PlayFest rehearsal I sketched was, My Lord, What a Night by Deborah Brevoort. The author was present and actively working on rewrites during the rehearsal. For the first half hour of the rehearsal the cast sat around the table going over new lines added or subtracted from the script. At first I thought I would not have enough time to sketch this process but then I leaped in and thankfully this part of the rehearsal lasted for more than the projected time allotted. For the second half of the rehearsal, all the actors stood at the music stands.

When famed African-American singer Marian Anderson (Sheryl Carbonell) is refused lodging because of her ethnicity, she finds an unlikely friend in Albert Einstein (Eric Zivot). Quick witted debates attempt to solve the nation’s problems over tea. Inspired by true events, this story explores the racial, religious, and gender-based struggles plaguing two of the most iconic entities of the 20th century.

Einstein wants to use his fame to protect Marian from the racism in America. He is so adamant about the cause because he narrowly escaped the Nazi racism against Jews during World War II. At the tie of this drama he worked at Princeton University and Aberham Flexner (J.D. Sutton) Abraham wanted to dissuade Einstein from letting Marian stay at his flat. The request seemed racist but he also felt it would seem inappropriate since both Einstein and Marian were unmarried. Another concern was that the college might loose funding because of the controversy. Flexner seemed like less of a villain when he explained that he was attempting to get Jews out of Germany with these funds.

Mary Church Terrell (Trenell Mooring) was arrested when she was trying to get into the Marian Anderson concert in Princeton. Trumped up charges claimed she was causing a disturbance when she asked where the theater was. When she finally got there, she found that these was only seating left for whites. Though old, she was a strong willed woman who wanted Marian to use her fame to address these racial injustices.

The rehearsal was not a straight forward read through, so the timeline I saw was disjointed, but on a whole I was fully engaged as I discovered more about each character. This PlayFest production seemed to involve the most movement and blocking which was beautifully orchestrated by the director Kel Haney. Some scenes had to be run over and over to get the lines to work with the action. This show has an intriguing premise and is sure to be be fun to watch on the stage.

Stage Manager: Justin Little, Stage Directions Reader: Rachael Lord

Be sure to catch this final PlayFest production. Be part of the creative process.
My Lord What a Night by Deborah Brevoort. Sunday November 11, 2018 at 1pm. At the Orlando Shakes, Margeson Theater (812 E Rollins St, Orlando, FL 32803).
Tickets are $10.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Saturday, November 10, 2018

PlayFest: The Great Beyond


I sketched a rehearsal for The Great Beyond by Stephen Dietz, leading up to their performance on Saturday, November 10, 2018 at the Orlando Shakes (812 East Rollins Street Orlando FL). This is a four character play that focuses on a family in a time of grief. Despite their differences, sisters, Monica (Courtney Bahr) and Emily, (Melanie Whipple) reunited to tie up loose ends after their father’s death.

The two sisters are always at each other's throats. Emily is the younger and perhaps favored daughter but she lived a life of addiction and with her recovery, she set a task of apologizing to everyone she had slighted.  This became her new addiction. Rene, another character, referred to the people Emily found as her "marks". Some of these apologies resulted in rifts that pulled other people's lives apart. The road to ruin is paved with good intentions.

The true seed of discontent between the sisters, however, is the death of a brother, Joseph, when they were young. Blame, whether founded or not, always surfaced in every conversation. Another point of contention was the estate left behind by the father. Emotions run raw when you want some physical object to remember someone by. Who gets what can become a battle that can divide any family. A coat or table might suddenly become the most important artifact to remind you of love.

Monica's Ex, Rex, (Cameron Francis) is there with his girlfriend, Rene, (Chelsey Panisch) who happens to be a medium. With her help, the siblings attempt to summon their father’s spirit to gain forgiveness and discover the truth. The second act revolved around this seance. Monica dismissed the seance as a hoax from the start but even she was swept up in the raw emotions in the darkened room.

I fell in love with this family as they stumbled to find their way after their father's death. For years an unspoken agreement had held the family together but after the father's death a greater truth was needed. What was so exciting about watching the rehearsal was that the script was in a constant state of flux. Having the author in the rehearsal resulted in his trimming and fine tuning the script as they rehearsed. Actors highlighted their lines as they were changed. Monologues could be made into more concise and polished gems. It was a fascinating process to watch. When you experience PlayFest you are actively participating in the development of new plays.

 
Director: Cynthia White
Stage Manager: Alli Gersbach
Stage Directions Reader: Krystal Rajkowski

Other Cast: Mark Ferrara as Coach Mayes. 

Tickets for The Great Beyond  by Stephen Deitz are $10. The performance is at 8pm tonight, November 10, 2018 in the Shakespeare Center Margeson Theater.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Friday, November 9, 2018

Weekend Top 6 Picks for November 10 and 11, 2018

Saturday November 10, 2018
4pm $10 PlayFest: I Can Go by Meridith Friedman. Orlando Shakes 812 Rollins Street Orlando FL. Armed with sharp tongues and dry wit, Richard and David navigate complex family relationships on the eve of their wedding. Despite hindrances ranging from white lies to life-altering secrets, I CAN GO uncovers human truths about the ones they love most. This contemporary and wryly humorous dramedy is the final installment in a series of three plays by Meridith Friedman, following The Luckiest People (produced by Orlando Shakes in April 2018) and Your Best One (read at PlayFest 2017). 

6:30pm $15 per person in advance; $18 per person at the door. PlayFest Party. Orlando Shakes 812 Rollins Street Orlando FL. Share a drink and dinner with your fellow PlayFest attendees, playwrights, and artist between readings in the Dr. Phillips Patron's Room. Buffet dinner provided by Tako Cheena.

8pm $10 PlayFest: The Great Beyond by Stephen Deitz. Orlando Shakes 812 Rollins Street Orlando FL. Despite their differences, sisters, Monica and Emily, reunite to tie up loose ends after their father’s death. With the help of a medium, the siblings attempt to summon their father’s spirit to gain forgiveness and discover the truth. 

Sunday November11, 2018   
Noon to 1pm Free. Yoga. Lake Eola near the Red Gazebo. Bring your own mat.

1pm to 4:30pm Free. Family Day on Second Saturday. The Mennello Museum of American Art, 900 East Princeton Street, Orlando, FL 32803. The make-and-take craft table is open from noon-2:30 p.m., and docents are available to give mini-tours of the museum. Then it's open house in the galleries until 4:30 p.m.

1pm $10 PlayFest: My Lord What a Night by Deborah Brevoort. Orlando Shakes 812 Rollins Street Orlando FL. When famed African-American singer Marian Anderson is refused lodging because of her ethnicity, she finds an unlikely friend in Albert Einstein. Quick witted debates attempt to solve the nation’s problems over tea. Inspired by true events, this story explores the racial, religious, and gender-based struggles plaguing two of the most iconic entities of the 20th century.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Thursday, November 8, 2018

PlayFest: I Can Go


I sketched the first read through rehearsal for  I Can Go by Meridith Friedman which is a Comic Drama at the Orlando Shakes (812 Rollins Street Orlando FL).

Armed with sharp tongues and dry wit, Richard (Dan Bright) and David (Alexander Mrazek) navigate complex family relationships on the eve of their wedding. Despite hindrances ranging from little white lies to life-altering secrets, I Can Go uncovers human truths about the ones they love most. This contemporary and wryly humorous dramedy is the final installment in a series of three plays by Meridith Friedman, following The Luckiest People (produced by Orlando Shakes in April 2018) and Your Best One (read at PlayFest 2017).

I had seen and sketched a production of The Luckiest People but missed Your Best One. Despite that I felt quickly up to speed and familiar with this family and cast who had already won my heart. The patriarchal father had passed away but the family had a way of resolving any differences with humor. Richard and David now have an adopted son, Josh (Connar Vidman). Josh didn't have a large part in the section of the rehearsal I sketched, but I heard him rehearsing in the Shakes lobby and thus knew something of his back story.  Richard's sister, Laura (Suzanne O'Donnell) spilled a family secret in her attempts to get the attention of her son Matt (Terance Lee) who seemed largely shut off, tuned in to his headset. Nancy (Kate Denson), David's mom sat with her back to me. She had a calming voice and seemed the anchor of fairness and reason as wedding plans escalated into petty arguments.

For me, this was time well spent with a family I already had grown to love, and a fun cast who seemed at home in this family’s skin. You don't have to have seen the previous two dramas by Meridith Friedman for this show to make sense. There was a relaxed humor as they eased into the comedic drama. This is clearly going to be a fun performance.


Director: Tara Kromer, Stage Manager: Jackqueline Hilliker, Stage Directions Reader: Kaley Pharr.

The performance will be on Saturday, November 10, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. Tickets are $10.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

PlayFest: Jane Burgoyne


I hid behind a tiki hut to sketch Jane Burgoyne by Robert Moulthrop during its live performance on Sunday.

Three generations of Burgoyne women are brought together as Jane (Kate Young) prepares to move from her beloved family home to an independent living facility. With tensions at an all time high, a lifetime of hurt bubbles up to the surface. In this intense family drama, three smart, strong women attempt to unpack their past and plan for whatever the future holds.

Jane and Alison (Megan Valle) had a strong bond built around their love of language and story telling. Yet even between them there were secrets. Alison held back that she is dating a guy who, it turns out, is rather controlling - which she sees as love. Also she was recovering from an eating disorder which she kind of misses.

“Do you really want to keep this, Mother?” Katherine (Michelle Brightman) asked her mom in "THAT" rather condescending voice. She was the one pushing to get her mom packed off which in her mind is for her mom's best interest. The only way these three could communicate was through arguments. The wounds were so deep that it is hard to imagine they could ever heal. There was no resolution, just a momentary truce. Each woman needed to discover just how in control they were of their own fate.

Director: Tony Simotes Stage Manager: Alli Gersbach Stage Directions Reader: Melissa Landy.

PlayFest continues November  10 – 11, 2018. It is a two weekend festival of new plays features seven readings of raw, unproduced works! PlayFest gives audiences the opportunity to be involved with the creative process by giving feedback in real time and mingling with the playwrights, actors, and directors.

Which readings will you attend?



Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Love the Cracksman


Love the Cracksman by Mark Brown offered some comedy a this year's PlayFest. Feats of daring-do are nothing new for the suave James Willoughby Pitt (Logan Benedict). Relying on his wits to stay one step ahead, Pitt bets he can commit the perfect crime. His determination takes him on a whirlwind adventure across the Atlantic. He gets a second class ticket on the Lusitania and spies the woman of his dreams in first class (Sarah Hubert). Reputation, fortune, and true love are at risk for Jimmy in this witty, fast-paced comedy. 

In the rehearsal I sketched, the actors were working their way through the second act when I entered and then after a break, they went back to the first act, so my impression of this comedy is very non-linear. Burglary is a fine art for some and the Cracksman only committed crimes to win a gentleman's wager. In truth he had more of the heart of a detective who would rather return stolen gems once the wager was won.

Logan wore a black jacket for the dress rehearsal. At one point the script called for him to place a stolen necklace in his jacket pocket, but his pockets were sewn shut. He explained that he bought the jacket for his wedding but never used it. Another member of the cast explained that sometimes the stitches just had to be removed. Without missing a beat the stitches came out without any interruption to the flow of the rehearsal.
 
Director Mark Shanahan had the actors crouching down behind the music stands when they were in hiding, and characters were in hiding quite often. I have no doubt that the final reading was a fun filled, tongue in cheek romp.

PlayFest is a two weekend festival of new plays features seven readings of raw, as of yet unproduced works! PlayFest gives audiences the opportunity to be involved with the creative process by giving feedback in real time and mingling with the playwrights, actors, and directors. Next weekend, November 10 and 11, 2018, three more plays readings will be presented, I Can Go by Merideth Friedman, The Great Beyond by Stephen Deitz and My Lord What a Night by Deborah Brevoort.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Monday, November 5, 2018

#God Hates You


#GodHatesYou by Emily Dendinger is part of the PlayFest line up at the Orlando Shakespeare Center (812 E Rollins StOrlando, FL).

“God punishes the wicked and rewards the good. #repentorperish” Having attended her first picket at five years old, Laurel (Amanda Anne Dayton) is proud of the good work she has done in the name of the Lord. While being groomed to be the next leader of her radical church (a fictional church similar to Westboro Baptist), she takes to Twitter to spread the Word. When her tweets are responded to by an agnostic college student, a rabbi, and a few Twitter trolls, Laurel struggles to determine the true meaning of her faith and define her relationship with God.

Laurel is a smart woman who believes in the sincerity of the message of hellfire and brimstone that she helps to spread. Via Twitter she converses with a rabbi who she considers to be damned. He ironically likes his exchanges with her and his theological arguments make her start to think. The play will incorporate projections so the audience can see the text exchanges as they happen. It was fascinating to follow her journey, because she was a good person, just raised in a hate filled congregation.

Probably the funniest moment came when the church members were shouting their hate in a demonstration. They knew exactly how long their permit allowed for the demonstration and when the time came, someone’s phone alarm went off with the silliest of elevator music ring tones. The signs went down and the demonstration was over. I only saw the first act in the rehearsal I sketched, but I am rooting for Laura to find her own voice and moral bearings.

What was truly fascinating about the rehearsal was that Emily, the author was refining and updating
the scrips as the actors did the read through. The creative process continues right until the moment the play opens to an audience.

Director: Kristin Clippard, Stage Manager: Lisa Hardt, Stage Directions Reader: Summer Pliskow, CAST: Mandi Lee as Colleen, Christine Gervais as Grace, Andy Gion as Donny, Carlos Pereyo as Joshua, James Putnam as Noah, and Mark Davids as Rabbi Cohen.

PlayFest runs November 2 – 4 and 10 – 11, 2018

A two weekend festival of new plays features seven readings of raw, as of yet unproduced works! PlayFest gives audiences the opportunity to be involved with the creative process by giving feedback in real time and mingling with the playwrights, actors, and directors.

Tickets to individual PlayFest readings ($10) on sale now!



Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Sunday, November 4, 2018

Boom at Theater on the Edge


 In the Boom pre show, video monitors announced the upcoming performance as if we were in line for a theme park attraction like Carousel of Progress at Disney World. Barbara, (Elaitheia Quinn) is the audience's guide in her orchestrated show about the end of civilization thousands of years earlier. She begins oddly enough by banging on a timpani drum. She then twists dials and pulls leavers bringing the action to life.

Jules, (Adam Minossora) a grad student in marine biology, and Jo, (Megan Raitano) a journalism student, meet on Saturday night in Jules’s small underground laboratory on a university campus, after Jo answers Jules’s online personal ad offering an encounter that promises “sex to change the course of the world.” Corrugated cardboard was duck taped to the ceiling and an obsessive chart tied together many fragments of research all leading to one ominous vortex. It is the type of chart you might expect from a mad man.

As Jo aggressively invited Jules' advances, while he tried to quickly fill the awkwardness with fast paced conversation. Both characters were manic and and full of energy. Jo kept flopping down on the mattress on the floor. She spoke with a thick Flushing accent. When the two of them finally kissed it was awkward. It may have been the worst kiss Jo had ever experienced.

There was a small fish tank at the back o the stage. Jules began to explain that his research on a deserted tropical island, uncovered patterns of behavior among the fish that seemed to indicate that they feared extinction. He began his research which verified that the earth would experience a devastating impact from an asteroid similar to the extinction event that wiped dinosaurs off the face of the earth.  So he turned his tiny lab and apartment into a place to wait out the disaster and begin remaking humanity. It turns out that Jules was a virgin and he thought he might be gay. When his research prediction proved to be true, it turned out he must live out his days with a woman who hates him.

Jules and Jo's dreams and aspirations for freedom seem to mirror Barbara's feeling of confinement in her dead end job running the museum attraction. When she ignored her duties running the attraction things went haywire. The play seemed to indicate that our differences are minor. We are a mere speck in the universe, yet life finds a way.

Boom at Theater on the Edge ( 5542 Hansel Ave, Orlando, FL 32809) began November 2, 2018 and runs through December 9, 2018. Tickets are $20 to $32. This is another cutting edge performance that will keep you on the edge of your seat.


Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com

Saturday, November 3, 2018

PlayFest at the Orlando Shakes


I went to the opening day of rehearsals for PlayFest at the Orlando Shakespeare Center (812 E Rollins St, Orlando, FL 32803). PlayFest presented by Harriett’s Charitable Trust is a two-week annual festival that provides a place for writers, theatre professionals, and audiences to connect and share ideas that promote thought-provoking stories. Audiences experience staged readings of seven new works over two weekends and participate in the development of new plays, conversing with playwrights, directors, and actors while absorbing groundbreaking new works. Over the years, the festival has introduced over 163 new works to regional and nationwide audiences.

The first rehearsal I sketched was 72 Miles to Go... written by Hilary Bettis and directed by Paul Castañede. Hilary and Paul sat side by side at the far end of the table. When a mother is deported to Mexico for the second time, the family struggles to reunite with so much red tape in their way. Set against the volatile backdrop of immigration in the United States during the Obama administration, 72 miles to go… gives us a glimpse at one family’s journey over eight years.

There were many heart warming moments as this initial reading allowed me to meet this family for the first time. The father, who was a Unitarian Pastor, had a sharp wit and tried to lighten any family argument with a joke. His wife had been sent back to Mexico when she was stopped for having a tail light out. His phone conversation with her was heart breaking since their love and respect was crystal clear, despite being forced to live apart. The title of the play comes from the distance between Tuscon, Arizona and Nogales, Mexico—and the distance between deported immigrant Anita (Leesa Castañeda) and her American-born husband, Billy (Joe Llorens) and her children.

When the younger sister Eva (Ana Martinez Medina) has a minor accident, the police escort her home. Being born in America she is a citizen, but her older brother, Christian (Diego Zozaya) faces the possibility of deportation every day. His younger brother Aaron (Rico Lastrapes) helped him
hide in a panic when the red and blue lights flashed outside their home. The play follows all the kids as they grow up in America, The sister becomes a valedictorian graduate from high school and in her speech to classmates she spoke of her mom's deportation for the first time. The youngest brother joins the military and the older brother raises his own family. Though growing up under very uncertain
conditions, each kid turned out fine and contributes to making America great.

The play is particularly relevant today as President Trump is spouting xenophobic rhetoric and hate against immigrants. He even claims he will overturn the 14th amendment, which states, “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside.” and he wants to deport any children born in America who came from illegal immigrants. In this time of deviciveness, it was so nice to fall in love with what is truly important, which is family, and everyday dreams and aspirations.

PlayFest runs from November 2 – 4 and 10 – 11, 2018. 7 original plays are on the banquet.

If you want to catch every performance you can purchase PlayFest passes.



Prints are available for each sketch for $250 and many originals can be purchased for $400. White museum grade shadow box frames are $100 more. You can e-mail Thor at analogartistdigitalworld@gmail.com